5-axis simultaneous milling at constant tilt angle with 3-axis strategies

I want to finish a part with deep cavities and without undercut. The part should be machined by simultaneous 5-axis machining with the shortest possible tool at a constant tilt angle. What should I do?

In Tebis, 5-axis toolpaths can be quickly and easily calculated within 3-axis functions – and not just for collision avoidance. You can control the desired tilt angle as needed using the Slope parameters.

Here's how you do it


Create an NCJob for machining surfaces with the "Nc3axJob/MSurf" function in the Job Manager.


Select the "3to5-axis" option in the "Strategy" dialog in the "Collision avoidance" area.


Specify the pivot behavior of the tool in the selection list for the "Alignment" parameter. In our example, we select the "Optimized" option.


To learn more about how to influence the pivot behavior of the tool, open the context-sensitive help in for the "Alignment" parameter.


Enter the tilt angle with which the surfaces are to be machined in the "Minimum slope" and "Maximum slope" parameters.


Start the calculation. The surfaces are now continuously machined in 5 axes at the specified angle of 30 degrees without a change in tilt angle.


Collision checking remains unaffected. If a collision would result at the specified tilt angle, the angle is automatically adjusted.


To learn more about how to easily use the possibilities for 5-axis simultaneous milling in 3-axis functions, call up the context-sensitive help in the 3-axis function in the "Collision avoidance" area.


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