Creating parallel curves on free-form surfaces

I want to define different areas on a free-form surface that are parallel to a curve at a specific distance. What's the best way to do this?

You can create any number of parallel free-form curves on surface elements in Tebis. The curves can then be stamped into the surface element without having to break up the topology.

Here's how you do it


Select the "Design/Cons/Parall" function (create parallel curve on surface). The "Parameters" dialog opens.


Enter the desired information in the parameter fields.

"Element:" Surface element on which the curves are to be generated.

"Curve:" Original curve to which you want to create the parallel curves. This is the yellow curve in our example.

"Distance:" Distance of curves from each other.

"Number:" We create three parallel curves in our example.


Confirm your inputs. The curves are created (green).


Select the "Design/Top/Stamp" function (change surface layout). The "Parameters" dialog opens.


Select the surface element in which the curves are to be stamped as well as the corresponding curves.


Confirm your inputs. The curves are projected on the surface and are extended tangentially up to the surface boundary. The surface element is split at these curves. The result is a topology. The surface structure of the topology is adjusted accordingly.


Open the context- sensitive help in the "Design/Cons/Parall" function to learn more about creating parallel curves on surfaces.

Open the context-sensitive help in the "Design/Top/Stamp" function to learn more about stamping curves.


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